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Maxx

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This is a trip report by a newbie for other newbies and newbie wannabes. MotoMoto (So nice you gotta say it twice) is my first EV and this is the first time I went outside it’s range.

The Short Story (What I learned)

Standard battery pack can be more than enough in east coast in good weather.
MotoMoto is a passing monster and I am starting to trust it.
What goes down, can come back up (My SOH).
EA can be better than Tesla if sample size is small enough.
Lightning dressed up as NY police looks really cool.
Charging stations may be outside your comfort zone if you are an introvert.
Gotta remember to bring a spray. Bugs on country roads can cover that windshield very quickly.


The Long Story

Trip Details:
MD to Ontario: 516 miles, 3 DCFC, 2.3 mi/kWh
Total trip: 1221 miles, 7 DCFC, 2.3 mi/kWh



Planning:
I planned the trip up with the ABRP but ended up completely ignoring it once on the road. The reason is that I was too much of a chicken and setup all parameters conservatively. The combination of everything ended up being too safe and made ABRP too pessimistic. I was traveling in almost perfect conditions so my range was much better than expected. On the way back I became too much of a daredevil and decided to travel with a Smi-ICE state of mind and have a close look at only the next charging stop and maybe a glance at the potential subsequent stop. This turned out to be just fine. I am not recommending this but it gave me confidence with regards to charging network for future fair weather trips in east coast.



Charging Experience:
I chose to travel on a weekday assuming charging may be less competitive. I don’t know for a fact, if this is true but it seemed that way. I was planning to run out of EA credit before trying a supercharger. All six EA charging were flawless. Except the last one that was during rush-hour. All four stalls were taken and one VW ID.4 was ahead of me. Before I could figure out where the closest supercharger was, two stalls opened (in less than 5 minutes).

The ID.4 Guy had a million questions about the Lightning and wanted answers to all of them before I took the last spot and before I could charge. The problem was that all questions sounded like they were in Chinese and he did not come with subtitles. It took me a while to realize he was speaking English and even longer before I could decode it to my version of English (I am an immigrant too). Just when I thought I had answered all of them, the wife came out of the car and started asking the same questions. By this time I was so fluent in whatever he was speaking that I started acting as an interpreter for the lyriq guy that was being hit with the same questions. Moral of the story is that if you are lonely, or need to practice English, charging stations are full of captive audience.

Ford F-150 Lightning DCFC virgin no more, a trip report 1715212249733-me


After one of EA charge sessions, no event was posted anywhere by Ford or EA. I thought I got away with free charging but it was deducted from my balance days later. At the end of my 250 kWhs, I went over by $0.16.

Superchargers: I got the Tesla membership but ended up using it only once for 56 kWh. The first stall went up to 166 kW quickly but faulted within the first minute. I could not get it to work again so I moved to another one. Luckily all eight stalls were open. I didn’t need to do any public charging in Canada. I did intend to see if I could use a supercharger without my phone but never got the chance to try it.

I had to get out of the truck several times to make sure that I won’t knock down a supercharger. My 360 camera view is absolutely useless when it comes to seeing corners which is the most important part of camera view for me. If anyone has a mod to improve this, please let me know.

Ford F-150 Lightning DCFC virgin no more, a trip report 1715212295631-44




EV travel vs ICE:
Over all, my body always felt like needing a stop when MotoMoto did and I never felt like I was waiting or wasting time. In fact whenever I went to the store, I felt like I was being rushed by that 80% SOC target. When I stayed with the truck, I had to cut whatever I was doing short when it was charged up. Only at 80% to 90% in one occasion it started to feel like waiting. I really didn’t need that 10% either but I wanted to be safe since I have a cheapo phone plan that has no coverage in Canada and had no experience charging there before.

Obviously when traveling with ICE, deciding where to stop is independent of energy but that didn’t seem to be as much of an issue as I thought. I had different expectations and that helped me enjoy the trip just as much as I would with ICE. In fact a little bit of uncertainty made the traveling experience more authentic.

Driving an EV can have other advantages. I feel like I got extra respect from Sheriff for driving a Lightning. He opened up space for me to get out of an only lane.

Ford F-150 Lightning DCFC virgin no more, a trip report 1715212374168-zt



Technobabble

Initial conditions before departure:
  • At 100% SOC displayed, real SOC was 96.06% and Energy 96.13 kWh
  • I started the trip with HVB at 79F, Outside temp 61F, SOH 98%
  • LVB SOC at 92%/13.3V
  • Motors: Pri 77F, Sec 84F
  • Inverters: Pri 91F, Sec 97F
  • Transmission: 70F
  • DC Coupler 1: 75F
Before the trip I charged at 7.5 kW to 100% SOC. Closer to 100%, it was much lower (as shown bellow).

Ford F-150 Lightning DCFC virgin no more, a trip report 1715212436063-b3


From what I saw from OBDII, I think I was losing 5%-8% of electrons before they made it to the battery but I will have to have a few more runs for a more accurate number.

Tire Pressure during drive: 40-41 PSI (minimal load). During first leg (136 miles), 99% energy went to Route with 2.1 mi/kWh efficiency. LVB SOC did not go up during drive and was at 91%. During charging at EA, 1.2 kW was being lost between the plug and the battery. Not sure how much between the charging station and the plug.

I am not sure if I understand this correctly but Max kW was always the same as current charging speed. Does this mean the truck was limiting the charging speed? It was in 80 kW-115 kW in a 150 kW station.

Here are some of the highest temps I saw on this trip:
  • HVB before charging started: 79F (no change)
  • HVB during charging: 106F
  • DC Coupler 1 during charging: 151F
  • Max outside temp 72F
  • Motors: Pri 136F, Sec 141F
  • Inverters: Pri 108F, Sec 111F
  • Transmission 106F
I did have some country road drives so at the next stop, even though route energy was down to 97%, efficiency was up to 2.3 mi/kWh. Notables at this stop was HVB SOH going up (from 98% to 99%).

I was very concerned about my HVB State Of Health on my truck going down faster than others. Despite other members saying it can go back up, I was not sure how internal resistance of the battery can decrease with age. I should note that on the same day, I had a 100% SOC level 2 charge (first in a very long time). I am not sure which one had more of an impact on SOH improvement.

At this location it seemed like I was losing 3kWh between the plug and the battery. I am not sure if it was because some components were warmer. There were times that power limit on the scanner showed as 165 kW, Max kW was 119 and it was charging at 95 kW. During other sessions Max was higher than Limit. Is it safe to assume, Limit is power limit set by the truck and Max is set by EA and the lowest one is the actual limit?

After This session LVB SOC went up to 93%.

In the 3rd stop, at times, power loss between the plug and HVB was showing as high as 6 kWh. I am not sure this was real or a matter of refresh rates of data. My LVB SOC at the end of this session went as high as 94%. Except the first, in the rest of EA stops, I started around 165 kW. I charged to 88% here but got no deduction in my balance or receipt of any kind. Only several days later my balance was adjusted.

Maximum HVB SOC module variation during the trip was 0.48% and Module variation 0.01V


Conclusion:

I no longer consider MotoMoto a local truck and trust it to go where no man (except the DCFC tech) has gone before.
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Ffxdude

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Great report and welcome to the road tripping club! 2.3 mi/kwh is a good average over the long drive at speed.
 
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Maxx

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Great report and welcome to the road tripping club! 2.3 mi/kwh is a good average over the long drive at speed.
Thanks. I think part of it may be tire pressure but mostly lower country road speeds and mild temps. If I was doing 80 in February all the way, it would have been a different story,
 

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As far as the rates of energy flow {demand / capacity / actual draw} the HVB BMS is ruling the process.

DCFC slows above 80% SOC and creeps more so above 90%, only time I would try to get as much energy out of DCFC is if I can't make the leap to the next station.

Optimize your park time by departing at 80% when possible.

Nice travel & charging report!!
 

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RickLightning

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queuewho

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Carlisle, PA? Charged there a ton.

Agree on chargers are bad for introverts. I'm only friendly on the internet. It's even worse when you are approached by an ICE driver who wants to know the specific answer to "how long does it take to charge?", and you gotta give an elevator pitch answer that explains how you aren't charging from 0-100...
 
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Maxx

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As far as the rates of energy flow {demand / capacity / actual draw} the HVB BMS is ruling the process.

DCFC slows above 80% SOC and creeps more so above 90%, only time I would try to get as much energy out of DCFC is if I can't make the leap to the next station.

Optimize your park time by departing at 80% when possible.

Nice travel & charging report!!
I was floating between 20% and 80% for most of the trip. I only went over 80% for the last charge before Canada. I was killing time so their rush hour dies down anyway. Wait time was not a problem at all.

Surprisingly, if I pick the Subaru for our upcoming Maine trip, it won’t be because of wait time or inconvenience. It would be because of cost of Energy.


Carlisle, PA? Charged there a ton.

Agree on chargers are bad for introverts. I'm only friendly on the internet. It's even worse when you are approached by an ICE driver who wants to know the specific answer to "how long does it take to charge?", and you gotta give an elevator pitch answer that explains how you aren't charging from 0-100...
Yup, that is where it was. Talking with ICE guys is like a public service. I was afraid and curious at the same time before I converted too so I don’t mind as much giving them the inside scoop. With other EV drivers, it should be an equitable exchange of tips and tricks for me to engage. Covid made me me spend more time with myself and realize nobody else can beat that ;). You are right about online relationships. The great thing about us is that we can turn each other off anytime we want. There is no off button at the charging station. Kidding aside, most people are cool. I just need to get out of my cave more often and reintegrate.
 
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Maxx

Maxx

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RickLightning

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When you evaluate a trip, make sure you consider several things before taking ICE (in addition to the EV taking 20% longer and whether charging exists on the route):

- That you leave with 100% energy provided at your home costs. I return with 10 - 20% (or less), so I assume 90%.

- That you understand the actual charging costs you expect. Look them up on PlugShare. Verify on EA and other apps. Some states still have charging per minute, instead of per kWh (by law). Those states, with an EA charger, and the Lightning charging up to 80%, are sometimes less expensive than home, based on the rate per minute the charger provides.

- That you push charging to less expensive chargers when possible (like the per minute state). Stop at the last EA charger in that state, charge to 80%. Don't add any more energy than you have to in the expensive state (some are 64 cents per kWh with EA!).

- That you consider whether programs like EA's Pass+ make sense for your trip (or Telsa's membership). Sign up morning of trip, immediately downgrade, takes effect in 30 days. Usually in 1 charge, may be 2, you have made your money back.

- Whether you find a hotel with free chargers.

- Whether you find DC fast chargers (and I mean fast enough) that are free. On a trip, I found a DC fast charger provided by the state of Utah that was free. It wasn't as fast as EA, but since my HVBJB had failed on the Mach-E, it didn't matter.

As you take trips, you'll find yourself getting more and more comfortable. We have taken a bunch of trips and been in 25 states and a province of Canada. MI to Florida, MI to Mass, MI to VT, MI to Colorado, then Utah, then California, and back again, MI to 8 national parks and 10 states, plus trips to O_io, Indiana, Missouri (picking up truck).
 

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Maxx

Maxx

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When you evaluate a trip, make sure you consider several things before taking ICE (in addition to the EV taking 20% longer and whether charging exists on the route):

- That you leave with 100% energy provided at your home costs. I return with 10 - 20% (or less), so I assume 90%.

- That you understand the actual charging costs you expect. Look them up on PlugShare. Verify on EA and other apps. Some states still have charging per minute, instead of per kWh (by law). Those states, with an EA charger, and the Lightning charging up to 80%, are sometimes less expensive than home, based on the rate per minute the charger provides.

- That you push charging to less expensive chargers when possible (like the per minute state). Stop at the last EA charger in that state, charge to 80%. Don't add any more energy than you have to in the expensive state (some are 64 cents per kWh with EA!).

- That you consider whether programs like EA's Pass+ make sense for your trip (or Telsa's membership). Sign up morning of trip, immediately downgrade, takes effect in 30 days. Usually in 1 charge, may be 2, you have made your money back.

- Whether you find a hotel with free chargers.

- Whether you find DC fast chargers (and I mean fast enough) that are free. On a trip, I found a DC fast charger provided by the state of Utah that was free. It wasn't as fast as EA, but since my HVBJB had failed on the Mach-E, it didn't matter.

As you take trips, you'll find yourself getting more and more comfortable. We have taken a bunch of trips and been in 25 states and a province of Canada. MI to Florida, MI to Mass, MI to VT, MI to Colorado, then Utah, then California, and back again, MI to 8 national parks and 10 states, plus trips to O_io, Indiana, Missouri (picking up truck).
Great tips. If I can get free charging at the hotel in between and at my destination where I stay, it could even out. Plus, lightning is more comfortable.

Not sure if I asked you this before; does plug and charge work in Canada Superchargers? Or you need to activate with an app?
 

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Great tips. If I can get free charging at the hotel in between and at my destination where I stay, it could even out. Plus, lightning is more comfortable.

Not sure if I asked you this before; does plug and charge work in Canada Superchargers? Or you need to activate with an app?
Tesla's app works in both countries. Plug and Charge does also for Tesla.

EA in Canada is Electrify Canada. Plug and Charge does NOT work, nor does the EA app or EA Pass+, you'd have to join the Canada one.

On my VT, I did Tesla's membership and avoided EA Canada.

Nearly all hotel charging is level 2, so it's only worth it at night when you're a guest. For those with ER batteries, you need to do some math and see if you'll be at 100% by morning, and then figure out whether you need to hit a fast charger prior to get their. PlugShare usually has the speed, take off 10% for loss and do the math.
 

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As far as the rates of energy flow {demand / capacity / actual draw} the HVB BMS is ruling the process.

DCFC slows above 80% SOC and creeps more so above 90%, only time I would try to get as much energy out of DCFC is if I can't make the leap to the next station.

Optimize your park time by departing at 80% when possible.

Nice travel & charging report!!
Agree completly. I let it go to just a little over 80% just to let that transtion to occur when using the DC charger and then top off at home. The rate at Chargpoint charger in West Boylston is set by the town so it $.15/KWH and home is $.30/KWH so I spend about $1.50 or so more but get home 15-20 mins earlier. One thing, I've started to clean the truck while charging so lately I've been going to 90%

I have yet to use this but it's under the back seat:
https://www.amazon.com/Simplicity-Canister-Cleaner-Handheld-Charcoal/dp/B07YST5BSF/ref=sr_1_2_sspa
 

Ventorum94

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This is a trip report by a newbie for other newbies and newbie wannabes. MotoMoto (So nice you gotta say it twice) is my first EV and this is the first time I went outside it’s range.

The Short Story (What I learned)

Standard battery pack can be more than enough in east coast in good weather.
MotoMoto is a passing monster and I am starting to trust it.
What goes down, can come back up (My SOH).
EA can be better than Tesla if sample size is small enough.
Lightning dressed up as NY police looks really cool.
Charging stations may be outside your comfort zone if you are an introvert.
Gotta remember to bring a spray. Bugs on country roads can cover that windshield very quickly.


The Long Story

Trip Details:
MD to Ontario: 516 miles, 3 DCFC, 2.3 mi/kWh
Total trip: 1221 miles, 7 DCFC, 2.3 mi/kWh



Planning:
I planned the trip up with the ABRP but ended up completely ignoring it once on the road. The reason is that I was too much of a chicken and setup all parameters conservatively. The combination of everything ended up being too safe and made ABRP too pessimistic. I was traveling in almost perfect conditions so my range was much better than expected. On the way back I became too much of a daredevil and decided to travel with a Smi-ICE state of mind and have a close look at only the next charging stop and maybe a glance at the potential subsequent stop. This turned out to be just fine. I am not recommending this but it gave me confidence with regards to charging network for future fair weather trips in east coast.



Charging Experience:
I chose to travel on a weekday assuming charging may be less competitive. I don’t know for a fact, if this is true but it seemed that way. I was planning to run out of EA credit before trying a supercharger. All six EA charging were flawless. Except the last one that was during rush-hour. All four stalls were taken and one VW ID.4 was ahead of me. Before I could figure out where the closest supercharger was, two stalls opened (in less than 5 minutes).

The ID.4 Guy had a million questions about the Lightning and wanted answers to all of them before I took the last spot and before I could charge. The problem was that all questions sounded like they were in Chinese and he did not come with subtitles. It took me a while to realize he was speaking English and even longer before I could decode it to my version of English (I am an immigrant too). Just when I thought I had answered all of them, the wife came out of the car and started asking the same questions. By this time I was so fluent in whatever he was speaking that I started acting as an interpreter for the lyriq guy that was being hit with the same questions. Moral of the story is that if you are lonely, charging stations are full of captive audience.

1715212249733-me.png


After one of EA charge sessions, no event was posted anywhere by Ford or EA. I thought I got away with free charging but it was deducted from my balance days later. At the end of my 250 kWhs, I went over by $0.16.

Superchargers: I got the Tesla membership but ended up using it only once for 56 kWh. The first stall went up to 166 kW quickly but faulted within the first minute. I could not get it to work again so I moved to another one. Luckily all eight stalls were open. I didn’t need to do any public charging in Canada. I did intend to see if I could use a supercharger without my phone but never got the chance to try it.

I had to get out of the truck several times to make sure that I won’t knock down a supercharger.

1715212295631-44.png




EV travel vs ICE:
Over all, my body always felt like needing a stop when MotoMoto did and I never felt like I was waiting or wasting time. In fact whenever I went to the store, I felt like I was being rushed by that 80% SOC target. When I stayed with the truck, I had to cut whatever I was doing short when it was charged up. Only at 80% to 90% in one occasion it started to feel like waiting. I really didn’t need that 10% either but I wanted to be safe since I have a cheapo phone plan that has no coverage in Canada and had no experience charging there before.

Obviously when traveling with ICE, deciding where to stop is independent of energy but that didn’t seem to be as much of an issue as I thought. I had different expectations and that helped me enjoy the trip just as much as I would with ICE. In fact a little bit of uncertainty made the traveling experience more authentic.

Driving an EV can have other advantages. I feel like I got extra respect from Sheriff for driving a Lightning. He opened up space for me to get out of an only lane.

1715212374168-zt.png



Technobabble

Initial conditions before departure:
  • At 100% SOC displayed, real SOC was 96.06% and Energy 96.13 kWh
  • I started the trip with HVB at 79F, Outside temp 61F, SOH 98%
  • LVB SOC at 92%/13.3V
  • Motors: Pri 77F, Sec 84F
  • Inverters: Pri 91F, Sec 97F
  • Transmission: 70F
  • DC Coupler 1: 75F
Before the trip I charged at 7.5 kW to 100% SOC. Closer to 100%, it was much lower (as shown bellow).

1715212436063-b3.png


From what I saw from OBDII, I think I was losing 5%-8% of electrons before they made it to the battery but I will have to have a few more runs for a more accurate number.

Tire Pressure during drive: 40-41 PSI (minimal load). During first leg (136 miles), 99% energy went to Route with 2.1 mi/kWh efficiency. LVB SOC did not go up during drive and was at 91%. During charging at EA, 1.2 kW was being lost between the plug and the battery. Not sure how much between the charging station and the plug.

I am not sure if I understand this correctly but Max kW was always the same as current charging speed. Does this mean the truck was limiting the charging speed? It was in 80 kW-115 kW in a 150 kW station.

Here are some of the highest temps I saw on this trip:
  • HVB before charging started: 79F (no change)
  • HVB during charging: 106F
  • DC Coupler 1 during charging: 151F
  • Max outside temp 72F
  • Motors: Pri 136F, Sec 141F
  • Inverters: Pri 108F, Sec 111F
  • Transmission 106F
I did have some country road drives so at the next stop, even though route energy was down to 97%, efficiency was up to 2.3 mi/kWh. Notables at this stop was HVB SOH going up (from 98% to 99%).

I was very concerned about my HVB State Of Health on my truck going down faster than others. Despite other members saying it can go back up, I was not sure how internal resistance of the battery can decrease with age. I should note that on the same day, I had a 100% SOC level 2 charge (first in a very long time). I am not sure which one had more of an impact on SOH improvement.

At this location it seemed like I was losing 3kWh between the plug and the battery. I am not sure if it was because some components were warmer. There were times that power limit on the scanner showed as 165 kW, Max kW was 119 and it was charging at 95 kW. During other sessions Max was higher than Limit. Is it safe to assume, Limit is power limit set by the truck and Max is set by EA and the lowest one is the actual limit?

After This session LVB SOC went up to 93%.

In the 3rd stop, at times, power loss between the plug and HVB was showing as high as 6 kWh. I am not sure this was real or a matter of refresh rates of data. My LVB SOC at the end of this session went as high as 94%. Except the first, in the rest of EA stops, I started around 165 kW. I charged to 88% here but got no deduction in my balance or receipt of any kind. Only several days later my balance was adjusted.

Maximum HVB SOC module variation during the trip was 0.48% and Module variation 0.01V


Conclusion:

I no longer consider MotoMoto a local truck and trust it to go where no man (except the DCFC tech) has gone before.
I too have road-tripped my SR Lightning, with pleasure (btw, the difference between road-tripping an ER and an SR is one more charging stop in a 500mi day, and $12,000 less first-year depreciation). However, I’ve found that access to Tesla Superchargers has effectively eliminated charger anxiety. I’m using the A2Z Adapter (my Ford/Tesla adapter isn’t due to arrive for months yet, and anyway, I believe the A2Z is a superior and safer design, based on reviews from those who have the Tesla/Ford). EA stations with 350kW Hyperfast are generally great; only problem is having to wait for a charger (almost always some idiot with free charging trying to get to 100%; my last encounter was with a Hyundai Ionic 6 driver with a new temporary tag, who unplugged at 92% and told me not to bother because the charger wasn’t working!) Tesla Supercharging is plug-and-charge on Fordpass, and cheaper than EA every time I’ve used it; my only gripe is the signage that says “Vehicle Charging Only” but because the Tesla name and logo are at the top, it can be interpreted as “Tesla Vehicle Charging Only,” resulting in some interesting stares
from Model X drivers.
 

RickLightning

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I too have road-tripped my SR Lightning, with pleasure (btw, the difference between road-tripping an ER and an SR is one more charging stop in a 500mi day, and $12,000 less first-year depreciation).
Don't know where you get the first year depreciation difference, that is way off IMO.

In the winter, ER that 33% more battery can be the difference in getting somewhere without charging. And if you tow, it gives an advantage.

For many, an SR is just fine.
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