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Is there a winch solution for these trucks yet?

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Zaptor

Zaptor

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I ran across this the other day while looking for a front receiver hitch: https://www.ironbullbumpers.com/products/2022-2025-ford-f150-lightning-front-bumper

Not sure what I think about it and will probably keep looking. I prefer using a receiver mount so you can winch from either end and I don't need to carry the weight all the time.
Yeah, that's pretty fugly... Would be nice if it had contours more similar to the vehicle, not all angular and harsh.
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GarageMahal

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lightningtamer

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Just got my lightning recently, so I haven't made any decisions yet, but I think I'm just going to use a recovery rope y bridle for the front, with a hitch mount for the rear. Run it off of my booster pack, which could be plugged in while running.
 

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GarageMahal

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Made this setup for a front receiver. The winch is mounted on a receiver so can be used front or back. The receiver mounts to an alloy steel flange bolted through the front tow rings.
Very interesting approach. I have been pondering a similar approach that replaced the tow rings but never thought of connecting directly to them.

Any concerns about the mounts twisting or rotating where it connects to the tow rings?
 

GarrettBlake

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The clamp to the tow ring is a flange on the top which is approximately the same shape as the outside of the ring itself, a flange on the bottom which protrudes forward several inches and has two holes in it. There is also a spacer in the middle that fits snugly inside the ring. There is a grade 8 bolt and nylock clamping it on to the ring through the middle of the ring. The material for the top and bottom are AR500 steel. The spacer in the middle is common mild steel. The smaller of the two holes is for attaching the receiver crossbar and the larger hole acts as a tow point since the normal tow ring is being used by the clamp itself. In order to attach the clamp, a bit of the rubber boot around the tow ring had to be removed.

The anticipated loads on the clamp are from either the receiver mounted winch (or some other receiver mounted device) or from using it to tow/move the vehicle. In the winch loading case, there is a bar connecting the two clamps together which the receiver is mounted to. The load is largely longitudinal (tension along the long axis of the truck) and distributed between the two clamps. I would expect very little torsional load on the clamps in this scenario. The spacer in the middle of the ring should provide good physical contact with the ring in that direction and the bolt provides some sheer strength. The winch is rated at 1500 lbs, and it is probably low compared to the load to tow the vehicle. In order to allow towing the vehicle, the large hole was created. This should allow the vehicle to get hitched without having to remove the clamp on the ring. In this scenario, there should be little torsion on the clamp since a tow hook is being used. The forces on the flange follow the direction of the tow cable being used. If there were upward forces on that tow point on the lower flange, then the bolt on the clamp becomes under a much greater tension load. Assuming the bolt does its job, since the top flange extends to the edge of the ring, it would get the load transferred to the ring.

I have not actually tested any of it for strength, but some initial calculations showed that in the winch case it would perform quite well. In the towing case I simply don't know. The AR500 steel and grade 8 bolt are pretty tough relative to mild steel, it was just a solution to the problem that seemed appropriate.
 

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The clamp to the tow ring is a flange on the top which is approximately the same shape as the outside of the ring itself, a flange on the bottom which protrudes forward several inches and has two holes in it. There is also a spacer in the middle that fits snugly inside the ring. There is a grade 8 bolt and nylock clamping it on to the ring through the middle of the ring. The material for the top and bottom are AR500 steel. The spacer in the middle is common mild steel. The smaller of the two holes is for attaching the receiver crossbar and the larger hole acts as a tow point since the normal tow ring is being used by the clamp itself. In order to attach the clamp, a bit of the rubber boot around the tow ring had to be removed.

The anticipated loads on the clamp are from either the receiver mounted winch (or some other receiver mounted device) or from using it to tow/move the vehicle. In the winch loading case, there is a bar connecting the two clamps together which the receiver is mounted to. The load is largely longitudinal (tension along the long axis of the truck) and distributed between the two clamps. I would expect very little torsional load on the clamps in this scenario. The spacer in the middle of the ring should provide good physical contact with the ring in that direction and the bolt provides some sheer strength. The winch is rated at 1500 lbs, and it is probably low compared to the load to tow the vehicle. In order to allow towing the vehicle, the large hole was created. This should allow the vehicle to get hitched without having to remove the clamp on the ring. In this scenario, there should be little torsion on the clamp since a tow hook is being used. The forces on the flange follow the direction of the tow cable being used. If there were upward forces on that tow point on the lower flange, then the bolt on the clamp becomes under a much greater tension load. Assuming the bolt does its job, since the top flange extends to the edge of the ring, it would get the load transferred to the ring.

I have not actually tested any of it for strength, but some initial calculations showed that in the winch case it would perform quite well. In the towing case I simply don't know. The AR500 steel and grade 8 bolt are pretty tough relative to mild steel, it was just a solution to the problem that seemed appropriate.
Any chance you'd consider fabricating/selling a couple of these adapters? I'd love to have the option to attach a front winch in a modular fashion that keeps the front end looking stock when not in use.
 


 


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